when you have seconds to capture a moment … and no camera!

If, like me, you are feeling creatively blocked or petrified by the thought of drawing “badly”, I highly recommend grabbing a pen or pencil and scribbling whatever your eyes fall on first. No more than 1 minute. Just do it!

Even if the result is unrecognisable, I promise you it’ll be very liberating!

Remember, no one has to see it. (Unless, like me, you have several social media accounts and poor impulse control!)  😉

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The giant Spirograph as large as a room that is just as precise as a hand-held toy

Dominating a whole room, it looks far too unwieldy to draw a geometric picture with a small ballpoint pen.

But this giant Spirograph graphic images that are both huge and unique each time.

Swedish artist Eske Rex constructed the ‘Drawingmachine’, which works by suspending two pendulums from separate wooden towers and connecting them through drawing arms and moveable joints.


Bigger is better: A giant Spirograph creates incredible precise geometric images with a standard ballpoint pen

A ballpoint pen, which is dwarfed by the apparatus surrounding it, rests on a drawing surface covered with paper and is mounted at the point where the pendulums come together.

 The pendulums are set in motion by hand, and their movements are represented by the drawing on the paper.

Mr Rex said: ‘I am interested in the machine as a sculpture in space, a constantly changing mobile.

‘In addition, the universe in the drawings is interesting by virtue of their spatial, textural, temporal qualities – a never-ending experiment where it is impossible to produce two identical drawings.’

 The ‘Drawingmachine’ was constructed by Swedish artist Eske Rex. Two pendulums are each suspended from a wooden tower and connected them through drawing arms and moveable joints

 Precise art: The pendulums are set in motion by hand, and their movements are represented by the drawing on the paper

Amazingly, he claims never to have heard of the Spirograph and was instead inspired by the harmonograph, a mid-19th century device that also uses pendulums to create a geometric image.

He explained the concept behind his huge gallery piece was to captivate the audience.

‘The movements of the pendulums affect the entire room, and the experience engages the beholder’s body,’ he said.

‘While the rhythmic repetitions cause the beholder to pause, the drawing emerges on the paper.’

 Unique design: Mr Rex claims to have never heard of the Spirograph and was instead inspired by the harmonograph, a mid-19th century device that also uses pendulums to create a geometric image

 Unfamiliar pattern: Spirograph sets were popular in the 1960s and 1970s

Drawingmachine by Eske Rex from Core77 on Vimeo.

 

The giant Spirograph as large as a room that is just as precise as a hand-held toy | Mail Online.

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